One downside to moving your house to so many different locations can be the varied and unknown quality of the water available. Many RVs have a rust, scale and sediment filter for all incoming water, plus a charcoal (carbon) filter at the sink and/or ice maker. These all require periodic replacement.

Filtering the main incoming water line for rust and sediment is a good idea, but only a charcoal filter will provide any improvement in the taste. If you have a water dispenser at your sink, or an ice maker, it’s quite likely there’s a charcoal filter in the supply line.

As charcoal filters also remove chlorine, we avoid using one on the main water inlet, since we want some base level of chlorine (the same level as in a typical city water system is fine) in our fresh water tank to help protect the water in the tank

The whole-house filter uses a typical residential element, available at home improvement stores, which is designed for a 4-6 month life of typical use. Since we use a fraction of the water that a traditional “stick” house does, we generally change that filter only once a year.

The amount of water we use from the dispenser at our sink is so minimal that we change the charcoal filter there only once every other year. The same goes for our 2nd charcoal filter under the fridge that takes care of the ice maker.

Filter replacement is an easy task, requiring no tools, except possibly a crescent wrench to ensure the tightness of the fittings on Flow-Pur filters prior to installation (they tend to be a bit loose when you buy them).

After flushing out the initial shot of black charcoal-filled water from the drinking water filters, they’re good to go, and will help improve the taste of your water, regardless of where you’re located. Of course they aren’t magic, and we’ve been to some places where bottled water is the rule of the day. 😉


 

Related Videos:

Featured & Related Products:

(Be SURE to buy the correct one for your RV… threaded, clip-on, etc).