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LED Your RV – Part 11 – Increasing Exterior Visibility

LED Your RV – Part 11 – Increasing Exterior Visibility

As with many of our RV projects, upgrading to LED lights has been a process. A thoughtful, deliberate, ongoing process. We started out with the lights we used most, primarily for power savings and heat reduction. We’ve been slowly but surely replacing our “old school” lights (i.e. incandescent, halogen & fluorescent) with cool, modern LEDs. In this round of upgrades, we’re targeting visibility… both how well we can see, and how well we can be seen by others.

As before, we’re using lights from M4. They not only the highest quality we’ve seen, but Steve, the man behind M4, is a creative force in identifying many different styles of lights for all sorts of RV use. No surprise really, since he’s a fellow RVer, and a super bright guy. ????


Visit M4products.com and enter the Coupon Code “RVGEEKS5
at checkout to receive a 5% discount on your entire order!
Shop now at: 
m4products.com


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woodreaux

Wednesday 19th of December 2018

Y'all do a great job. I recently purchased my first RV and am thankful for your upgrades and the thought you have put into them. I am unhappy with exterior lighting as well, particularly the backup lights. Sad! Can you share some details on your installation of your back up lights? I think I would like them on a separate switch and not just wired into the chassis b/u lights.

TheRVgeeks

Wednesday 19th of December 2018

Thanks so much! For our back-up lights, we simply replaced the old incandescent bulbs with the correct LED with the same base (most of these are round bases, like most car bulbs). We'd suggest that a direct swap is easier than wiring them in separately, and makes sure they come on automatically whenever you put your rig into reverse, same as before.

Lou @RVHabit

Friday 31st of August 2018

I have a small LED light in my service bay. After seeing this I realized I am struggling. A future upgrade on my list for sure. Great Job guys.

Gary Gonzales

Wednesday 22nd of August 2018

I own a 2004 Winn Vectra diesel pusher and accomplished the Led conversion. Things I learned was to purchase the warm lighting as the cool white was to bright. I also converted basement storage lighting to the cool white as this area needed bright lighting. I will tackle the marker lights this year. I purchased led lighting they Amazon and overall price was under 300 dollars. I also added side cameras to aid hiway driving. I have enjoyed the work and was simple once I started the projects. If you have question feel free to contact me Gary at jeaalb@juno.com

James Dillon

Wednesday 22nd of August 2018

Thanks for the informative video. You folks do a great job in educating us "newbies". Much appreciated. Great choice for a tow vehicle - Honda CRV! We just took delivery of our 7th CRV- we wavered and bought a Cadillac for 2 years and the "Warden" rebelled enough I had to get back the CRV. Good choice! Safe travels gentlemen! A sincere Canadian FAN!

TheRVgeeks

Thursday 23rd of August 2018

Thanks, James! And we know how you feel about the Honda! We LOVE our CR-V and wish that the new ones were flat towable! ?

John Koenig

Wednesday 22nd of August 2018

Why is it necessary/recommended to have LED bulb colors match the lens color? I've never heard that before.

TheRVgeeks

Wednesday 22nd of August 2018

Hi John. The reason it’s recommended is because LED lights don’t emit light across all spectrums the way incandescent bulbs do. So when you put a bulb behind a lens of a different color, the lens blocks too much of the light and won’t be bright enough. That’s why it’s important to match the color of the LED to the color of the lens. In a pinch you can use pure white or natural white LEDs behind any color lens, but they won’t be as bright.

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